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Commitment Day Festival Set to Inspire Improved Health in the New Year

In News by Becca Blomquest / December 3, 2014 / 0 Comments

As the battle of the bulge wages on in America, we’re seeing skyrocketing obesity rates and lower life expectancies among children. Life Time–The Healthy Way of Life Company aims to inspire positive change by opening its doors to the community and hosting one million workouts across the country during its Commitment Day Festival (January 1), Fun Run (January 1-4) and Indoor Triathlon Workout (January 4).

Set to take place at 113 Life Time destinations from coast to coast, the festival will feature healthy family events all weekend long. In addition, 52 Life Time destinations will host the annual Commitment Day 5K Fun Run on January 1 for all ages and abilities to join together in a symbolic commitment to lead healthier, more active lives in 2015. Adding on to the weekend of fitness fun includes the inaugural Indoor Triathlon Workout on January 4 in partnership with IRONMAN at 79 Life Time destinations to encourage and educate people of all athletic abilities on the sport of triathlon.

“The Commitment Festival is all about doing our part to inspire a healthier America,” said Bahram Akradi, founder, chairman, president and CEO of Life Time. “On the heels of successful Commitment Day 5K Fun Run events the last two years, we have expanded it this year to become a four-day festival that features a wide variety of educational workshops and invigorating classes that fit most interests. Ultimately, it is our goal to help individuals and families make 2015 their best yet in terms of taking charge of their health, wellness and happiness.”

The Commitment Festival is open to both members and non-members and will kick off on January 1, 2015 with the Commitment Day 5K Fun Run taking place in 52 cities around the country. The Commitment Day Festival offers a variety of educational and entertaining events, including:

  • Daily Fit Talks and Workout Workshops (January 1) – The FIT Talks series is designed to educate and empower participants with approachable, relevant and simple life-changing actions, such as breaking up with sugar, eating fat to burn fat and explaining why counting calories won’t lead to long term results. Participants also may attend a Workout Workshop in which they’ll have an opportunity to learn and burn with new workouts such as ViPR, LT Connect, Strength and Flexibility, Battling Ropes, Upper Body Strength & Tone and more.
  • Alpha Madness (January 2) – The Life Time Alpha program is designed for anyone looking to lose weight or enhance performance. Participants will start with a Get Connected Seminar to introduce heart rate training via LT Connect, which helps them train smarter not harder. From there, they’ll have the opportunity to compete against themselves in an Alpha Workout focused on functional movements suitable for all ages and fitness abilities.
  • Yoga Commitment Jam (January 3) – Yogis and beginners alike will de-stress from the holidays and kick off a commitment to yoga with 90-minute Vinyasa Flow class suitable for all ages and abilities.
  • Indoor Triathlon Hour powered by Life Time Tri and IRONMAN (January 4) – Redefine your 2015: commit to tri. If you’ve ever wanted to try a tri, this is where to start. Inspiration without intimidation, the 60-minute indoor workout will feature a 10-minute pool swim, 30-minute spin and 20-minute treadmill run. Athletes of all abilities from beginner to experienced are invited. All participants who register for and attend the Indoor Triathlon Hour ($25 fee) receive a lifestyle training shirt, swim cap, race bib, $20 off a $100 purchase at the ironmanstore.com, one free month of Masters swim lessons with Life Time Swim (new participants only) and $10 off a purchase of $50 or more at LifeSpa, plus, are eligible for a chance to win one of three slots to the 2015 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in Zell am See-Kaprun, SalzburgerLand, Austria or, one of five slots to a Life Time Tri Series race. Learn more about event locations and registration at www.indoortri.com. Limited spots available per club. BONUS: Anyone who goes to ironman.com/committotri, fills out the form and registers for a Life Time or IRONMAN 70.3 branded triathlon in the United States or Canada between November 20, 2014 and January 4, 2015 will be entered in for a chance to win one slot to the 2015 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii!

 

The Commitment Day Festival will also feature the Commitment Bowl, a football-focused activity where parents and kids alike will practice their passing, catching, agility drills and cheerleading skills, Poolapalooza and an indoor pool party featuring beach-inspired pool games and tropical tunes. Each day will wrap up with an evening celebration such as a healthy happy hour, social cycle class or LifePower Yoga class.

Registration is now open for Commitment Day 5K Fun Walk/Run events. Kids 12 and under are free. For more information about Commitment Day, or to register for the January 1 5K fun walk/run near you, visit commitmentday.com. Be sure to like Commitment Day on Facebook and follow the movement on Twitter for the latest updates and event news.

Ring in the new year with fitness and get on track for a fun, happy and healthy 2015. We hope to see you there!

How to become a better swimmer… without getting wet!?

In News,Training by Becca Blomquest / September 18, 2014 / 0 Comments

By Coach Troy Jacobson

If there were a way to improve your swim times without spending endless hours in the pool, would you do it? I think I heard a resounding “YES,” throughout the airwaves! The truth is that getting adequate pool time is a challenge, particularly for the busy triathlete! Business trips, family obligations, travel time to and from the pool and inconvenient lap or Masters swim hours can negatively affect your performance. It’s a good thing there’s dryland training to save the day. Here are a few ideas for all busy triathletes to consider as a way to round out their training program:

1. Invest in elastic tubing.
Elastic (or surgical) tubing offers a variable resistance throughout any given range of motion, and in this case the pull phase of the freestyle stroke. Simply attach the tubing to a door handle or other stationary object, place your hands in a swimming position, step back a few steps, bend at the waist and start simulating the freestyle stroke. The further you pull away from the anchor point, the more resistance there is in the band. Focus on using good technique (i.e. Early Vertical Forearm) and vary your tempo. The beauty of elastic tubing (of any brand) is that it’s affordable, convenient to pack in your travel bag and is an effective means for drilling proper stroke mechanics and building sport-specific strength. I recommend that business travelers always carry tubing with them while on the road and complete several sets of 15-25 reps every day. And better still, bands are a great tool to use for warming up, especially prior to staring a tri where getting in the water is not allowed.

2. Swim bench
The swim bench concept has been around for years and there are a few brands on the market. While all are credible, the one that most triathletes are probably familiar with is the Vasa. In recent years, Vasa has introduced the Vasa Ergometer. This clever bench, steeped in technology, not only provides the swimmer with a great workout that enhances both swim conditioning and technique (without getting wet!), but it also details the data, including stroke count, power per stroke, speed, etc. If you find it a challenge to get adequate pool time and you have the financial means, a swim bench in your basement is the ultimate in dryland swim training specificity.

3. Pump it up!
While elastic bands and swim benches offer very specific movement patterns for swimmers, let’s not forget the value of good ‘ole strength training! Most competitive swim programs have their swimmers undergo a steady regimen of core work (abs and lower back), stability training and explosive power training (e.g. box jumps, medicine ball work, etc.).

While there’s ultimately no substitute for quality time in the water, it’s possible for the busy triathlete to maximize their swim by incorporating a clever combination of ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ swim training.

Coach Troy Jacobson is the Head Endurance Coach for Life Time Fitness. A former pro triathlete, he’s also the co-author of the book, Triathlon Anatomy, a guide to strength training for triathletes, published by Human Kinetics. 

Should You Eat or Drink Your Race Fuel?

In News,Nutrition by Becca Blomquest / September 18, 2014 / 0 Comments

By Brooke Schohl, MS, RD

You have many, many choices when it comes to fueling for endurance races. Your local running, bike or triathlon shop’s shelves are lined with countless products and options…making things a little confusing! Before you wade through all of the brands, nutritional content, ingredients and flavors, it’s important to answer one question: will you use solid or liquid nutrition to get you across that finish line with flying colors?

Most pro triathletes and elite runners use liquid nutrition alone in the form of drinks or gels for longer races. But then again, they are pros. They finish the race up to nine hours sooner than the age groupers do, which makes a big difference. Remember that you are unique and that your fueling strategy probably won’t be the same as your favorite pro, or even your training partner.

I get this question all of the time — solids or liquids? — and the answer is dependent upon a variety of factors. The following considerations will help you make your decision:

The Task at Hand
What event are you training for? Half marathon? Marathon? 70.3 triathlon? A huge factor determining your fuel plan is the type of activity your race entails and of course, the length of the race. Most people have a tough time getting solids down during a run, whereas consuming these foods on the bike is much easier due to the nature of the activity. It’s important to really get in tune with your body — your likes, dislikes and toleration of fuel sources. I always feel that more natural food and drink options will produce better results. So many athletes have adopted clean eating regimens in their everyday lives, and why muddy that up by consuming chemical-filled, engineered products on race day?

Gastrointestinal Toughness
Most liquid nutrition options are primarily carbohydrate. Of course protein can be added to these drink mixes, but carbs are the star of the show. For many of my athletes, consuming large amounts of carbs (without protein and fat) is a killer on the old GI tract. The fuel is absorbed quickly, leaving athletes feeling hungry with inconsistent energy levels. On the flip side, some athletes are unable to consume any solids during racing due to the intensity of the pace or fickle stomachs. Which one are you? Do you do best with mainly carbs, or some protein and fat? Maybe you can handle a combination of liquids and solids if the race is long enough to demand it.

Hourly Caloric Intake
How many calories do you need per hour to get through the race? Athletes with lower caloric requirements can more easily get away with just liquid nutrition. When fueling for training and racing with metabolic efficiency in mind, the amount of calories you actually require is probably much lower than what you are consuming. Metabolic efficiency is a way of fueling that promotes burning fat stores (we all have them) for fuel rather than the more common reliance on high-carb food or drink sources. Wouldn’t it be nice to unload some of those race-day calories and take in only 10 to 30 grams of carbohydrate per hour? You can do it!

Osmolality
Did you know that your body is only able to efficiently digest and absorb a limited amount of calories per specified amount of time? I had an athlete who was over-concentrating his bottles by mixing too many calories into his water bottles. This quickly led to GI distress on race day due to the body’s inability to digest and absorb all the nutrients. For this reason, it is very important to avoid overloading drink mixes and opt for lower calorie options.

Preferences During Training
What do you like to eat during training? During racing? What foods work best for you? If you don’t know, now — during training — is the time to experiment. Challenge yourself to try new things; you may be surprised at what you can get away with. I recommend consuming carbs with protein and fat for as long as possible, then switching over to carb alone towards the end of the training session or race. The longer you can control blood sugar by not consuming carb alone, the more fat is being oxidized. Train your body to stay in a fat-burning place longer by adding fats and proteins to those training/racing fuel carbs. A great example of this is Pocket Fuel, a fruit and nut puree that contains almost equal amounts of carbs, fat, protein and has demonstrated great success among ultra runner and triathlete populations.

Like many other aspects of nutrition and training, there are different strokes for different folks. Meaning, what works for you may not work for your training buddy and vice versa. There are many variables at play here; trial and error during training blocks will help you determine the best course of action for you. Seeking the advice of a sports dietitian never hurts either.

Brooke Schohl, MS, RD, METS, is a registered sports dietitian and the owner of Fuel to the Finish Endurance Nutrition Coaching in Scottsdale, Arizona. She is an avid triathlete, having completed many triathlons of all distances including three Ironman races. She integrates that personal experience and knowledge into developing customized, sport-specific, metabolically efficient fueling plans for her clients. Brooke and her husband, John, own two Scottsdale, Arizona-based triathlon stores named Destination Kona. For more information on services and offerings, visit her website at www.fueltothefinish.com.

Mack Cycle New Title Sponsor of 2014 Escape to Miami Triathlon

In News,Press Release,Race updates by Becca Blomquest / September 4, 2014 / 0 Comments

2,150 Triathletes Set to Swim, Bike and Run in Annual Miami Event

Life Time – The Healthy Way of Life Company announced today that Mack Cycle and Fitness, a top bike retailer in South Florida for the past 57 years, will be the title sponsor of the 10th annual Escape to Miami Triathlon. Set for September 28, the Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon is part of the nationwide Life Time Tri Series.

“Mack Cycle and Fitness has been involved in triathlons for more than 20 years and is a long time sponsor of the Escape to Miami Triathlon. As we continue to grow this event and integrate ourselves into the nationally recognized Life Time Tri Series, it’s exciting to take our relationship to the next level and sign Mack Cycle as title sponsor, especially as we approach our 10 year anniversary event,” said Race Director Javier Sanchez. “We share a passion for triathlons, endurance events and encouraging people to live a healthy way of life and look forward to showcasing all that Miami has to offer in this unique triathlon.”

Course
Competitors in the Olympic distance, presented by Muscle Milk, will be ferried to “Escape Island” in Biscayne Bay for a scenic start. Racers then will swim .9 miles back across open waters to Margaret Pace Park to transition onto a 24.8 mile bike course over the Julia Tuttle Causeway to Miami Beach that includes eight bridge crossings and then a 6.2 mile running course on the MacArthur Causeway to Star Island and back. The Sprint distance, also presented by Mack Cycle and Fitness, provides a .25 mile swim along the shoreline followed by a 13 mile bike course and a 3.1 mile run.

Expo
In addition to the Triathlon, a Health Expo will be held Saturday and Sunday, September 27 and 28 for race participants and spectators to see and experience sponsors and local partners latest products and services. The Expo will also have speakers covering topics on health and fitness, and race day tips. Expo hours are 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday and 7 a.m. – 1 p.m. on race day.

Should You Eat or Drink Your Race Fuel?

In News,Nutrition by Becca Blomquest / September 2, 2014 / 0 Comments

By Brooke Schohl, MS, RD

You have many, many choices when it comes to fueling for endurance races. Your local running, bike or triathlon shop’s shelves are lined with countless products and options…making things a little confusing! Before you wade through all of the brands, nutritional content, ingredients and flavors, it’s important to answer one question: will you use solid or liquid nutrition to get you across that finish line with flying colors?

Most pro triathletes and elite runners use liquid nutrition alone in the form of drinks or gels for longer races. But then again, they are pros. They finish the race up to nine hours sooner than the age groupers do, which makes a big difference. Remember that you are unique and that your fueling strategy probably won’t be the same as your favorite pro, or even your training partner.

I get this question all of the time — solids or liquids? — and the answer is dependent upon a variety of factors. The following considerations will help you make your decision:

The Task at Hand
What event are you training for? Half marathon? Marathon? 70.3 triathlon? A huge factor determining your fuel plan is the type of activity your race entails and of course, the length of the race. Most people have a tough time getting solids down during a run, whereas consuming these foods on the bike is much easier due to the nature of the activity. It’s important to really get in tune with your body — your likes, dislikes and toleration of fuel sources. I always feel that more natural food and drink options will produce better results. So many athletes have adopted clean eating regimens in their everyday lives, and why muddy that up by consuming chemical-filled, engineered products on race day?

Gastrointestinal Toughness
Most liquid nutrition options are primarily carbohydrate. Of course protein can be added to these drink mixes, but carbs are the star of the show. For many of my athletes, consuming large amounts of carbs (without protein and fat) is a killer on the old GI tract. The fuel is absorbed quickly, leaving athletes feeling hungry with inconsistent energy levels. On the flip side, some athletes are unable to consume any solids during racing due to the intensity of the pace or fickle stomachs. Which one are you? Do you do best with mainly carbs, or some protein and fat? Maybe you can handle a combination of liquids and solids if the race is long enough to demand it.

Hourly Caloric Intake
How many calories do you need per hour to get through the race? Athletes with lower caloric requirements can more easily get away with just liquid nutrition. When fueling for training and racing with metabolic efficiency in mind, the amount of calories you actually require is probably much lower than what you are consuming. Metabolic efficiency is a way of fueling that promotes burning fat stores (we all have them) for fuel rather than the more common reliance on high-carb food or drink sources. Wouldn’t it be nice to unload some of those race-day calories and take in only 10 to 30 grams of carbohydrate per hour? You can do it!

Osmolality
Did you know that your body is only able to efficiently digest and absorb a limited amount of calories per specified amount of time? I had an athlete who was over-concentrating his bottles by mixing too many calories into his water bottles. This quickly led to GI distress on race day due to the body’s inability to digest and absorb all the nutrients. For this reason, it is very important to avoid overloading drink mixes and opt for lower calorie options.

Preferences During Training
What do you like to eat during training? During racing? What foods work best for you? If you don’t know, now — during training — is the time to experiment. Challenge yourself to try new things; you may be surprised at what you can get away with. I recommend consuming carbs with protein and fat for as long as possible, then switching over to carb alone towards the end of the training session or race. The longer you can control blood sugar by not consuming carb alone, the more fat is being oxidized. Train your body to stay in a fat-burning place longer by adding fats and proteins to those training/racing fuel carbs. A great example of this is Pocket Fuel, a fruit and nut puree that contains almost equal amounts of carbs, fat, protein and has demonstrated great success among ultra runner and triathlete populations.

Like many other aspects of nutrition and training, there are different strokes for different folks. Meaning, what works for you may not work for your training buddy and vice versa. There are many variables at play here; trial and error during training blocks will help you determine the best course of action for you. Seeking the advice of a sports dietitian never hurts either.

Brooke Schohl, MS, RD, METS, is a registered sports dietitian and the owner of Fuel to the Finish Endurance Nutrition Coaching in Scottsdale, Arizona. She is an avid triathlete, having completed many triathlons of all distances including three Ironman races. She integrates that personal experience and knowledge into developing customized, sport-specific, metabolically efficient fueling plans for her clients. Brooke and her husband, John, own two Scottsdale, Arizona-based triathlon stores named Destination Kona. For more information on services and offerings, visit her website at www.fueltothefinish.com.

Free Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Tri Info Session on September 3

In News,Training by Becca Blomquest / August 29, 2014 / 0 Comments

Training for the Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon? Don’t miss this awesome opportunity to attend a FREE info session from the Life Time Athletic Events team. The event will be held at the Mack Cycle and Fitness store, so you’ll be able to pick up all your essentials for training and race day! This info session will be offered on the following date:

September 3
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Info session topics include:

  • Registration process
  • Schedule of events
  • Packet pickup process and location
  • Course review
  • Training tips
  • Nutrition tips
  • Course review
  • Q&A session

All attendees will receive a complimentary training shirt!

> Click here for more information

Intelligent Fueling for Race Day

In News,Nutrition,Training by Becca Blomquest / August 13, 2014 / 0 Comments

By Brooke Schohl, MS, RD

Learn to give your body the right amount of food and drink to perform at your best with these tips.

They say that nutrition is the fourth discipline in a triathlon. Under-fueling leads to bonking and over-fueling can translate to gastrointestinal issues. When you learn to give your body just the right amount of food and drink in order to perform at your best, then you have mastered the elusive fourth discipline. But alas, this is not an easy task.

Use the following intelligent fueling tips to help you conquer this challenge and have a great race!

Only Fuel When Necessary
Most athletes are fueling way too soon and with too many calories (translation: carbohydrates). This mistake negates the body’s ability to tap into fat stores for energy before switching over to carbohydrate as the major substrate utilized. Even in extremely lean athletes, internal fat stores vastly outweigh carb stores, making fat the nutrient of choice to burn. Remedy this by waiting to fuel – two to three hours into a workout or race is just fine. Fat stores jump into action, providing energy to the body during this time period. After two to three hours have passed, you can begin feeding the body calories – carbs as well as fat and protein.

Consider the Race Distance
This tip goes hand in hand with the previous one. For a Sprint triathlon or even an International distance for some athletes, no dietary fuel is needed during the race. Challenge your body’s internal fuel stores to catapult into action rather than relying on dietary carb right away!

Remember — Nutrition is Cumulative
Crappy nutrition throughout the year plus great nutrition in the week leading up to the race equals selling yourself short. The positive effects of a solid everyday fueling plan will shine through on race day. You’ve heard the analogy of an athlete’s body being equated to a high-performance car. Give the car low-octane gas and its performance is limited. Give the car the high-octane gas and it reaches its full potential. Conversely, great everyday nutrition and terrible training nutrition also fail the athlete come race day. Example: the clean-eating athlete who trains with Pop Tarts and soda. The key is to keep it consistent. Eat clean all day, everyday – training and racing included.

Hydrate Properly
It’s the day before the big race. True or false: You should be drinking everything in sight to be fully hydrated and primed for the big day. False! Just hydrate adequately, making sure to use urine color as your guide. A pale yellow color deserves a thumbs up. Anything darker than that and you need more water. Add electrolytes as needed, dependent on factors such as sweat rate, race climate and length of the race.

Consider Fueling Options
Athletes have many, many options when it comes to sports products used during training or racing. Make your selections count: read and understand labels and be comfortable with the ingredients. Check out some of the more natural sports products hitting the market (i.e. Huma Gel, Pocket Fuel, Ignite products). CLIF Bar, with their efforts to include organic ingredients whenever possible, is another worthwhile option. Because CLIF is the official on-course nutrition for Life Time Tri, training with the products you will be using during the race could help you avoid gastrointestinal issues on race day.

Another viable approach is to use real food for fuel. Dried fruit such as figs and dates provide excellent carbohydrates. Don’t use training as an excuse to wolf down doughnuts or that king-size Snickers. Using them during training doesn’t make them any healthier.

Moral of the Story
Less is more. Despite what your friends or sport product packaging may tell you, more is not more. You don’t need 400 calories per hour. You don’t need to drink a gallon of water pre-race. You don’t need to refuel with as many calories as you burned. Be smart and seek the help of a Metabolic Efficiency Training Specialist for more guidance.

Brooke is a registered sports dietitian and the owner of Fuel to the Finish Endurance Nutrition Coaching in Scottsdale, Arizona. She is an avid triathlete, having completed triathlons of all distances including 3 Ironman races. She integrates that personal experience and knowledge into developing customized, sport-specific fueling plans for her clients. Brooke and her husband, John, own Destination Kona Triathlon Store and Destination Kona/Triple Sports in Scottsdale, Arizona. For more information on her services and offerings, Brooke can be reached at brooke@dktristore.com.

Running Laps – Learn How Triathletes Get Faster with Track Work

In News,Training by Becca Blomquest / August 13, 2014 / 0 Comments

By Coach Troy Jacobson

There’s an old saying that goes, “If you want to run fast on race day, you need to run fast in training.” And the best way to get faster is to hit the track!

Runners, whether focused on the 5K or the marathon, have long used track work as a tool to build speed, strength and a well developed sense of pacing. Hitting “the oval” on a weekly basis with an eye on the clock keeps one accountable and focused on improving. Add the competition and fun that training with a group offers, as well as the guidance and workout management of a good coach, and you have a recipe for future personal bests in your next running race or triathlon.

Triathletes who use the track have slightly different goals than those of ‘pure runners.’ In addition to having the need to recover for the training demands of two other sports, the triathlete needs to be mindful of avoiding injury, and overly demanding and fast track work can do just that. Furthermore, pure speed development for the triathlete isn’t as high of a priority as is running strong and steady off the bike on tired legs. Therefore, most of the work done on the track should target the enhancement of strength, endurance and holding a desired running pace. In most cases, reps (or intervals) aren’t run at a ‘sprint’ pace, but more so at ‘tempo’ and ‘lactate threshold’ paces, on shorter rest intervals. Also of importance is that the triathlete finishes track sessions with some gas left in the tank. This ensures adequate recovery for upcoming swim and cycling workouts.

The following is an example of track session for a triathlete in the mid-season form, targeting a late season Olympic distance race.

Warm-up (3 x 200 striders at 200 jog recovery)
Jog 1-2 miles easy. Perform some simple dynamic stretches, then do a set of 3 x 200 striders (focus on form and stretching it out) at 200 jog recovery.

Main set (1-mile tempo at ½ marathon pace / 2 x 800 (10K pace ) at 400 jog, 4 x 400 (5K pace) at 200 jog)
After the warm-up, start with a mile tempo effort at roughly your ½ marathon race pace. This pace is steady and hard, but not overwhelmingly hard. Jog at 400 easy after the mile.

Next, prepare for a set of 2 x 800 on a 400 jog recovery. Run each 800 at your 10K race pace, which is hard yet very sustainable. Jog another 400 easy recovery lap.

The last set is to be 4 x 400 at your 5K race pace, or slightly faster. Focus on good running form and try to even split each rep. Your recovery is an easy 200 jog, so get ready to dig deep in order to hold your splits.

Cooldown (1-2 miles easy, and light stretching.)
The conditioned triathlete in mid-season form should finish this workout tired, but with enough energy and strength to complete several more reps if tasked, while still holding pace.

Incorporate track work into your weekly training regimen and watch your performance take a leap to the next level!

A former pro triathlete and coach since 1992, Troy Jacobson is the creator of Spinervals Cycling and the Sr. National Director of Endurance Sports Training for Life Time Fitness. Learn more at www.lifetimeendurance.com.

Free Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Tri Info Session on August 20

In News by Becca Blomquest / August 13, 2014 / 0 Comments

BHSF-Logo

Want to get ahead of the competition for the 2014 Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon? Join us for a FREE info session hosted by Baptist Health South Florida on Wednesday, August 20 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. with Escape to Miami staff and industry professionals to help get you race-day ready.

Location:
Doctors Hospital
5000 University Dr.
Coral Gables, FL 33146

Speakers include the co-founder of the Escape to Miami Tri, Frankie Ruiz; Sports Medicine Physician, Michael Swartzon, M.D; and Physical Therapist, Noel Gressner. You’ll leave feeling encouraged and empowered with knowledge to tackle this triathlon.

Complimentary training shirts and special discounts await all attendees. We hope to see you there!

Join the Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon Team for a FREE Webinar on August 27

In News,Training by Becca Blomquest / August 7, 2014 / 0 Comments

The 2014 Mack Cycle Escape to Miami Triathlon is fast approaching. What better way to prepare for race day than by attending a FREE webinar hosted by a combination of industry professionals and local event producers, Wednesday, August 27 at 7:30 p.m. as they cover a wide a variety of topics to help prepare you for a stress-free weekend and your best triathlon yet!

Webinar topics include:

  •   Registration process
  •   Schedule of events
  •   Packet pickup process and location
  •   Course review
  •   Training tips
  •   Nutrition tips
  •   Course review
  •   Q&A session

Space is limited. Click here to reserve your spot now! After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer

Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet